Quite a Way to Go

October 28, 2013 by Bill Ivey

"That Rock Band," a parent said, shaking his head. Clearly searching for words, he added, "Wow." It was not an uncommon reaction, and when I emailed my usual post-concert congratulations to the group, I told them about the moment and noted, "Yes, you performed that well; you literally left people speechless." It's true, from the first notes pounded out on the piano as they slammed through "Yoü and I" by Lady Gaga, through the last, sweet harmonies held over a cymbal roll and an echoing piano chord as they ended "Just the Way You Are" by Bruno Mars et al, they were amazing, all of them: Bonnie, Charlotte, Heather, Jin, Joy, Joyce, McKim, Molly, Natalie, Olivia, and Susan. And when I pointed out that the vocalists wrote all the harmonies themselves, the speechless factor among audience members rose even higher.

This is just our first performance, just a few weeks into the year. While six members of last year's group returned and one moved up from the middle school band, four were brand new, and one of those was a complete beginner to her instrument. Yet, they came together so thoroughly and so rapidly that we chose and began working on our next two songs even before the first performance, something we have only rarely been able to do in the past.

Filed Under: gender, find your voice, girls' education, Lady Gaga, Rock Band, Performing Arts, girls' school, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School

Through Peace, Through Dialogue, Through Education

October 10, 2013 by Bill Ivey

“Education is a power for women.”
- Malala Yousafzai

“This question is hard!” a student good-naturedly pointed out to me. “You always ask such broad questions.” “Of course it’s hard,” I said. “I want you all to think, to think deeply, to - how do I put this? - learn things.” I gave her my “Call me crazy” shrug and she turned back to her discussion partner to figure out “What is a girl?”

Filed Under: gender, girls' education, International Day of the Girl, In the Classroom, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, Women in media, Malala Yousafzai, Current Events

Living The Kite Runner

September 19, 2013 by Guest Faculty Bloggers

Standing in line for food during Formal Dinner last week, I was approached by a new student, "S." '14 (her name has been withheld to protect her anonymity), whom I’d only known from house parenting duties. She told me, in her quiet manner, that my 11th graders’ English summer reading book, The Kite Runner, is her favorite novel. She continued by telling me that she is a Hazara, of the same tribe as Hassan, one of the significant characters in The Kite Runner, and that she has experienced similar discrimination growing up in Afghanistan as he has in the novel. As IB learners I thought that the girls would benefit from meeting "S." and hearing her story, as it relates to The Kite Runner, and I asked her if she would be interested in talking to both of my classes. "S." graciously, and without any hesitation, accepted my invitation.

"S." had prepared a Power Point presentation in advance and she began by giving us a brief history of Afghanistan and telling us about her family. She then proceeded by relating her experiences growing up in Afghanistan to The Kite Runner. The thing that struck me the most was that "S." at such a young age was able to talk about her difficult experiences with such clarity and in such an unblemished manner. She has already gained perspective and made sense of her country’s violent history and the effect it has had, and still has, on her family and her people. "S." has decided not to let her experience bring her down; instead she has been able to turn it into something positive. She told the class about her volunteer work at the same orphanage in which one of the characters in The Kite Runner grew up. She and her sisters have had the rare opportunity to pursue an education and "S." is a courageous and passionate advocate for girls’ education and women’s rights. At a very young age she has her goals set and is determined to make a change in the world.

Filed Under: afghanistan, girls' education, IB, In the Classroom, The Kite Runner, The Faculty Perspective, International Baccalaureate, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School