World Day of Social Justice 2020

February 20, 2020 by Bill Ivey

In a combined middle school advisory yesterday, Sam Torres ‘08, the faculty advisor to Community Alliance, led the students in watching and discussing “I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype,” a TEDx talk by Canwen Xu.

Filed Under: Middle School, anti-racism, social justice, Middle Level Education, World Day of Social Justice

Knowledge is Power

January 20, 2020 by Guest Student Author
 

Filed Under: Martin Luther King Jr, anti-racism, Martin Luther King Day, civil rights

Intersections: Boo

October 31, 2019 by Bill Ivey

Many of my online friends are teachers, active or retired, and many of them have recently been sharing advice urging people to give teenagers a smile and some candy if they come trick-or-treating. I love the posts, thinking, of course, of my own students but also of teenagers everywhere, every one of them somebody’s kid.

Filed Under: anti-racism, teenagers, Halloween, youthism

Summary: Bill Ivey’s day at the 2019 AISNE Diversity-Equity-Inclusion conference

October 29, 2019 by Bill Ivey

On October 24, 2019, I attended the 2019 AISNE Diversity-Equity-Inclusion conference. A recurring theme through the day (as articulated by keynote speaker Dr. Philip McAdoo) was transitioning schools from head to heart.

Filed Under: anti-racism, equity, diversity, inclusion, LGBTQ+ Support, AISNE

Intersections: Head to Heart, a report from the 2019 AISNE Diversity-Equity-Inclusion conference

October 29, 2019 by Bill Ivey

Welcome and Morning Keynote

As we were waiting for the 2019 AISNE Diversity-Equity-Inclusion conference to start, the person sitting to my right leaned over to introduce himself. I recognized his name immediately, since Clyfe Beckwith is the Assistant Head for Teaching and Learning at Andover, from which my son graduated. I knew about some of the school’s more recent initiatives through newsletters and, as we got to talking about Andover’s firm and ongoing commitment to looking honestly at how they are supporting their kids and taking concrete steps to grow continually, one of the themes became (as morning keynote speaker Dr. Philip McAdoo would put it) how to transition a school from head to heart. The perfect introduction to the day!

Filed Under: anti-racism, equity, diversity, inclusion, LGBTQ+ Support, AISNE

AISNE Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Conference - Oct. 24, 2019

October 29, 2019 by Guest Faculty Bloggers

Conference write-up provided by Señora Fiori.

Filed Under: anti-racism, equity, diversity, inclusion, AISNE

Intersections: "Everybody, Everybody..."

January 30, 2019 by Bill Ivey

On Saturday, January 19, eight members of the Stoneleigh-Burnham community attended a diversity conference, 'Everybody, Everybody': Reimagining Gender and Sexuality in Our Schools," hosted by Vermont Academy. Our group, or “pod” in the terminology of the Dalton Conference model, represented a past and present cross section of students, faculty, staff, administration, parents, alums, and trustees.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, diversity, LGBTQIA Support, Gender Diversity, feminist school, Conference, LGBTQ+ Support

I Can’t Breathe

January 23, 2019 by Guest Student Author

By Mia Mullings

Filed Under: student voice, anti-racism, Martin Luther King Day, Students of Color, Black pride

Spoken Word

January 21, 2019 by Guest Student Author

by Yanique Jacques

Filed Under: student voice, anti-racism, Martin Luther King Day, Students of Color, Black pride

Intersections: Choosing your battles

January 12, 2019 by Bill Ivey

Recently, I got called out on Twitter. It used to be, like many (most?) of us, that being told I was causing offense, being racist, and/or hindering the work for social justice would lead me to break out in a panicky sweat, want to figuratively or even literally run away, and/or passionately defend myself as “a good person.” By now, though, it’s happened often enough that I’ve learned to view it positively as someone caring enough to engage with me, to challenge me to do better in their eyes (granting that this is easier to process via social media than in the immediacy of face-to-face conversations). And I’ve learned that at such moments, their eyes are generally seeing things I would otherwise miss and that I really need to know. Trying to remain open to being called out, whether on Twitter, in person, or wherever, has enabled me to learn and grow more quickly and more surely than I otherwise would have been able to - in short, to be a better ally.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice, Feminism, social media