On the Right Track

February 01, 2017 by Bill Ivey
  • The general public has viewed her sports as lesser; his sports are more widely regarded and compensated than hers.
  • Media has favored his sports over hers.

From the updated “Declaration of Sentiments” written by the Humanities 7 class along with girls from Bancroft School, Center School, Eaglebrook School, Four Rivers Charter Public School, Hampshire Regional School, and Hilltop Montessori School.


I often feel like I have to apologize for being a fan of the UConn women’s basketball team. They’ve won four straight NCAA Division-I championships, their current win streak (which broke their own record of 90) stands at 95, and their average margin of victory is in the double digits. Other than the UCLA men’s basketball team of the John Wooden era, no program that I can think of has dominated a college sport to this extent. So some baggage comes with identifying as a UConn fan, especially if you didn’t actually go there.

Filed Under: women in sports, Sports, anti-racism, National Girls and Women in Sports Day, Feminism, Women in media, Intersections

Students and Faculty participated in the Clarkdale Cider 12k Run

November 14, 2016 by Guest Faculty Bloggers
by Andrea Tehan Carnes
 
On Sunday morning, November 13th, five students and four faculty members got out of bed, put on a few layers, and went over to Clarkdale Farms to run in a 12k road race. The five students who ran are also members of our school's Cross Country Team who did extra training each week in order to be able to run the 12k distance after the regular season had ended. It was a beautiful sunny but windy day, and the girls did a wonderful job!

Filed Under: women in sports, Sports, Running

Resolution

May 01, 2016 by Bill Ivey

It’s one of those cold and rainy days that keeps me online more than I would be otherwise on a Sunday with most of my class prep behind me and all student writing having received feedback. That’s fortunate, because otherwise I might not have seen Mel Greenberg’s tweet that Imani Boyette and her mom Pamela McGee might become the first-ever mother-daughter pair to play in the WNBA if Ms. Boyette can make the regular season roster for the Chicago Sky. The WNBA is the longest-running women’s professional league in U.S.history, and it feels encouraging that it is reaching this major landmark.

Filed Under: women in sports, social justice, gender equity, equity, WNBA, Feminism, NSWL

No Makeup Policy

February 13, 2014 by Bill Ivey

As I pulled into the parking lot of Target in attempt to find a yellow T-shirt for our Spirit Week Colour Wars skit, my phone beeped to tell me I had a text. It was Jeff Conlon, our Athletic Director, asking me if I was watching the Olympics and quoting one of the announcers. It turned out they were talking about the women’s downhill race and the tough course, and focusing on how strong and skilled and athletic the racers were...

Just kidding. The actual quote Jeff texted me was “Maybe a bit of makeup” and it turned out the announcers were, surprise of surprises, focusing on how the women looked and what they were wearing. I couldn’t disagree with his comment, “horrible,” even if I had wanted to. Which I didn’t. As he added later in our text-conversation, “Talk about taking the focus off the amazing athletic accomplishments and making them into ‘girls.’”

Filed Under: women in sports, gender, media, Feminism, Women in media, Current Events

Oh, joy. One whole day.

February 05, 2014 by Bill Ivey

Whatever you might have thought of the Super Bowl, at least it's a chance for the people of Seattle to celebrate their first championship in pro sports in 35 years, right?

Filed Under: women in sports, gender, athletics, social justice, On Athletics, National Girls and Women in Sports Day, Feminism, Women in media, Current Events

Meeting of Minds

December 02, 2013 by Bill Ivey

One day in Humanities 7, class, we were talking about different ideas of what is feminism and what is feminine when suddenly their voices began to get louder and more urgent. There was an edge, and I could tell there was something below the surface I hadn’t quite deciphered yet when one of the girls told another, “You’re a dudist!” Before I’d recovered laughing from the inventive spontaneity of the word “dudist,” I knew I had finally figured out what was going on: some kids in the class viewed feminism as inherently anti-men, while others didn’t. I explained that, while there is indeed a small and often vocal group of feminists who are anti-men and who perhaps get disproportionate coverage in the media, by no means do they speak for all feminists. One could, I told the kids, in fact argue there are as many kinds of feminism as there are feminists. And that led to an inspiration.

“Some of the strongest feminists in this school,” I told the students, “are in Ms. Durrett’s Sophomore Honors English class. Would you like to invite them to join us one day to talk about all this?” They loved the idea, as did Ms. Durrett and her students. Both classes wrote questions to help frame the discussion, and on the appointed day, the sophomores came streaming into our room, the eyes of former Humanities 7 students lighting up as their faces softened with memories. The kids all settled into every beanbag chair in the middle school, some doubling up, with a look of anticipation on their faces.

Filed Under: women in sports, gender, All-Girls, The Girls School Advantage, community, In the Classroom, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, Women in media, girls' school, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School

Nails in the Coffin?

April 25, 2013 by Bill Ivey

As many of you may know, and to no one’s surprise who follows women’s basketball, Brittney Griner, a 6’8” Senior from Baylor, was the first player to be chosen in the 2013 WNBA draft and will play for the Phoenix Mercury. With only three rounds and only 12 teams drafting, very few players are invited to attend in person, but of course Ms. Griner was there, all smiles, in a white tuxedo.

Two days later, during the course of an interview with “Sports Illustrated,” Ms. Griner was asked why she felt sexuality was no big deal in women’s sports. She responded, “I really couldn't give an answer on why that's so different. Being one that's out, it's just being who you are.” Asked if making the decision to come out had been difficult, she said, “It really wasn't too difficult, I wouldn't say I was hiding or anything like that. I've always been open about who I am and my sexuality. So, it wasn't hard at all.” Though the interview received a fair amount of attention on social media, it received attention more for the low-key “no big deal” feeling to the moment than for the news itself. As Wesley Morris said in his article “Brittney Griner and the Quiet Queering of Professional Sports,” “Maybe it was amazing for its utter whateverness.”

Filed Under: Brittney Griner, Middle School, women in sports, gender, Sports, gender stereotypes, athletics, On Education, Bill Ivey, Beautifully different, Gay-Straight Alliance, On Athletics, Acceptance, diversity, In the Classroom, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education

Bikinis, Lingerie, and Women's Athletics

February 28, 2013 by Bill Ivey

When I click out of my Yahoo! email, I often scan to see if there's a news item that interests or intrigues me. The other day, I was shocked and outraged to learn of the existence of something called the "Bikini Basketball Association" through an article entitled: "Deion Sanders' daughter joins the Bikini Basketball League (sic) despite her dad being 'kind of upset'."

Filed Under: Middle School, women in sports, gender, gender stereotypes, athletics, On Education, Bill Ivey, Deion Sanders, BBA, In the Classroom, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School

Growing Out of Over-Thinking

June 29, 2012 by Guest Faculty Bloggers

The following post was originally published in our Spring 2012 Bulletin. It was written by Bryna Cofrin-Shaw, a graduate of the class of 2010.

Filed Under: women in sports, Alumnae, Grades 7-12 and PG, On Education, Boarding and Day, Girls Schools, college, College Prep, All Girls Education, growth, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Graduation, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education

Ninja Women

February 07, 2012 by Bill Ivey

It's Sunday morning, February 5, and my Twitter feed is bursting with sports news and opinions. Most are about the Super Bowl, of course, and then, somewhat less mainstream, there's the one from Talib Kweli which links to an Atlantic article by Max Fisher on "Why Thousands of Iranian Women Are Training to Be Ninjas."

Filed Under: Middle School, women in sports, Grades 7-12 and PG, gender, Connecticut Sun, athletics, On Education, Boarding and Day, Ninjutsu, Boston Celtics, On Athletics, All Girls Education, Women's Professional Soccer, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, The Faculty Perspective, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education