Intersections: Through Another Set of eyes

October 15, 2017 by Bill Ivey

When you see the world through another set of eyes, it's a more beautiful place. - Melody Brook

I had a good fortune to attend the Translating Identity Conference on Saturday, October 14 at the University of Vermont. As the website says, “The largest conference of its kind in New England, TIC is a free, student organized, non-profit conference that seeks to reach not only the University of Vermont & the Burlington community, but the nation as a whole.” As I arrived, the “Welcome” was just getting underway, and Melody Brook, an adjunct professor at Champlain College and a member of the Einu Abenaki tribe, officially welcomed us with words and song to a site that once belonged to her people.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, transgender, Intersections, non-binary, gender non-conforming, Translating Gender Conference

Intersections: A Strong Wish I Make Every Night

February 20, 2017 by Bill Ivey
My kids are incredible. Just putting it out there (with all respect for the thousands and thousands of teachers who could and do say the same about their own kids, and with all respect for those kids as well). The kid who came waltzing into my office and almost sang, “Bill, I figured out something about myself. I’m pansexual!” The kid who said, “Whether you’re talking about romantic or sexual relationships, and whoever you’re into, I just don’t see how it’s anyone’s business but your own.” The kid who said, “Well, I’m really genderfluid, but it’s easier not to change my pronouns every day so I just use “‘they/them/their.’” The kids who went  “Awwwwww…” and “Finally!” when the best friend of the trans girl in George said, “And you know what? If you think you’re a girl… then I think you’re a girl too!” (Gino) They’re growing up with spectrums of sexuality and gender, embracing them as simply a part of their everyday reality. And I want them to feel that level of comfort, with themselves and with each other.

Filed Under: LGBT, LGBT Support, transgender, Intersections, Title IX

Intersections: Traditional Support

November 07, 2016 by Bill Ivey

Over the weekend, I came across an NAIS blog post by Debra Wilson on “Taking Steps to Support Transgender Students and School Communities.” I know that for national organizations, policy statements on transgender people can be fraught with difficulty as some member schools may be part of communities who simply do not accept trans identities. (Just the other day, at the AISNE Diversity Conference, several people in a session on supporting trans students said they as LGBTQ+ adults did not feel safe coming out in their schools. And that’s in New England, a region generally considered to be more LGBTQ+ friendly than many others.) I wondered what path NAIS had chosen. It turned out to be, perhaps unsurprisingly, a somewhat tentative middle ground.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, Education, transgender

Intersections: Opportunities

September 28, 2016 by Bill Ivey

The day when the transgender anti-discrimination bill becomes law in Massachusetts is fast approaching. On this Saturday, October 1, gender identity (which, as it is defined in the law, essentially includes gender expression) will become a protected class with regards to public accommodations. Businesses may no longer legally refuse service, provide deliberately inferior service, advertise or publicize that they discriminate based on gender identity, lie in order to facilitate discrimination, or harass or intimidate people based on their gender identity. (Gallitano and Zules) Massachusetts thus becomes the 18th state to offer this level of protection to transgender and gender non-conforming people.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, Education, transgender, Allyship, Intersections, Ally Week

Not So Visible

April 27, 2016 by Bill Ivey

trigger warning: transphobia and gender-based violence

“Just be yourself,” they say. “No one can be a better you than you. There is only one you in the world.”

They also say “It doesn’t matter what anyone else thinks.” and “Haters gonna hate.”

Yes. Well. All these well-meaning words of affirmation are certainly true at some level. And yet.

The Family Research Council has issued a five-point plan to, as Brynn Tannehill put it in her Huffington Post piece And Then They Came For the Transgender People, “legislate transgender people out of existence.” Their goals include ensuring transgender people may not legally change their gender, have no legal protection against discrimination, may not use public facilities in accordance with their gender identity, may not receive medical coverage related to transition, and may not serve in the military. (Tannehill) On their website, they urge resistance to non-discrimination laws, for example because they “mandate the employment of ‘transgendered’ individuals in inappropriate occupations, such as education.” (FRC)

Filed Under: LGBT Support, Education, transgender

Doing Our Part

November 16, 2015 by Bill Ivey

As it turned out, Alaine Jolicoeur, our French teacher-intern, and I wanted to attend the exact same sessions at Saturday’s GLSEN-Massachusetts conference and, as it turned out, we both had good instincts as that made for just about the perfect flow for the day. It began with keynote speeches focusing on affirming the wonderful spectrum of people attending as well as the inclusive theme “both/and,” moving on to a morning session dominated by trans and non-binary kids telling their stories and sharing methods of self-care, lunch, a session on intersectionality with a mix of kids and adults, a session attended entirely by educators on supporting K-8 kids, and finally a closing moment written and performed by those attending Trenda Loftin’s final workshop session.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, intersectionality, diversity, Gender Diversity, Education, transgender, GLSEN

Full of Ideas, Full of Inspiration

July 07, 2015 by Bill Ivey
The National Coalition of Girls Schools (NCGS) held their Annual Conference from June 22-24, 2015 at St. Catherine’s School in Richmond, Virginia. The theme was “From STEM to STEAM: Girls’ Schools Leading the Way.” Sally Mixsell, Head of School, attended along with science teachers Andrea Tehan Carnes and Meghan Lena, and Bill Ivey, Middle School Dean. Over the weeks following the conference, we are sharing our thoughts on what we learned and what we did.

 

Filed Under: LGBT Support, Girls Schools, Education, transgender, #NCGS15

What Does Caitlyn Jenner Mean to Girls Schools?

June 20, 2015 by Bill Ivey

From the moment Caitlyn Jenner first announced that she identified as a woman to her recent Vanity Fair cover and beyond, national attention has perhaps been more focused on transgender people than ever before. And as often happens on such occasions, the resulting storm of invective and counter-invective is deeply depressing, and the interspersed comments of respectful support deeply affirming. In the end, Ms. Jenner has chosen a path that makes sense for her true self; she is not there to further anyone’s political agenda nor to denigrate anyone’s personal values. And if, in the process, the general public learns some things about privilege in general and transgender people in particular, including those who, like Ms. Jenner, continue to identify within the gender binary, so much the better.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, transgender, #NCGS15

A Very Good Place to Start: On Teaching for Respect

December 01, 2014 by Bill Ivey

“Excuse me, ma’am?” I turned to see a woman approaching me as I sat working at Rao's coffee shop. “Yes?” I said. “Can you please give me directions to (we’ll say it was La Veracruzana)?” I did, and she thanked me, acknowledged my “You’re welcome,” and turned and left. Clearly, she was either open or oblivious to the contrast between whatever it was about my appearance (hair? clothing? something else?) that had caused her to “ma’am” me and my baritone voice. Myself, at this point in my life, I respond naturally to either “ma’am” or “sir,” reasoning that in either case, someone is addressing me respectfully.

Respect is the key word here. It’s what underlies most successful human interactions, and what is most often missing when dysfunction takes over. It’s a firm underlying principle in each of my classes. I expect respect not only for each other (which they almost invariably show anyway) but also for fictional characters, reasoning that if we are generally talking about them as if they were real, we might as well carry it to the logical extreme.

Filed Under: gender, LGBT Support, gender stereotypes, Transgender Day of Remembrance, anti-racism, social justice, gender equity, TDOR, Acceptance, diversity, In the Classroom, The Faculty Perspective, transgender

Trans 101.5

November 18, 2014 by Bill Ivey

Transgender Awareness Month comes right on the heels of National Bullying Prevention Month, and in many ways that makes sense, as transgender people are disproportionately affected by bullying (as with street violence). GLSEN reports that fully 82% of LGBT kids have had problems with bullying, 44% specifically due to gender identification (reported on the nobullying.com website). GLSEN’s 2013 National Climate survey is available by download for anyone who might be interested.

In an age where definitions of different genders are becoming as fluid as some people’s sense of gender itself, it can be hard to keep up with the latest terms. For starters, (biological) sex is not the same as (social) gender, and 1-2% of people are born neither female nor male but rather intersex. Additionally, even though “transgender” refers to someone whose gender identity differs from that assigned to them at birth, not everyone who might fit that definition automatically chooses to identify as transgender. Moreover, though some transgender people (such as noted teen activist Jazz Jennings, here in an interview with Katie Couric) feel they were always girls trapped in a boy’s body or boys trapped in a girl’s body, not all transgender people feel that way or even identify within the gender binary. Partially blurring the binary are bigender people and androgynes, and within the Native American tradition, two-spirit people. But other transgender people might identify as polygender, agender, genderqueer, or just plain nonbinary, and still others avoid terminology altogether. Some may have a stable gender identity while others might be more fluid. Facebook, as many people know by now, offers a menu of over 50 gender choices, and even then, it is not 100% comprehensive.

Filed Under: gender, LGBT Support, gender stereotypes, social justice, gender equity, Transgender Awareness Month, community, Acceptance, diversity, Feminism, The Faculty Perspective, Education, transgender