Winter Term Honor Roll Remarks

March 28, 2017 by Guest Faculty Bloggers

Delivered at the Upper School Honor Roll Assembly on March 28, 2017 by Kristen Peterson, Dean of Students at the request of Student Council.

We gather here today to celebrate the academic achievements of all of our students and to highlight those students who have earned honor roll or higher. I am honored to serve as your speaker today, though -- to be honest -- I feel a bit intimidated to be the one to speak on such academic achievements.

Filed Under: Honor Roll, social justice

Intersections: Vigil for Racial Justice

December 10, 2016 by Bill Ivey

I will be out of town on Saturday morning Dec. 10 and unable to attend the weekly Vigil for Racial Justice. But I stand nonetheless in support of our student who was twice subjected to racial harassment last weekend in our town, and in support of all our students of colour. I stand alongside others from our school who feel the same way. And I share here, scheduled to post the moment the Vigil starts, the poster I made for the first morning I attended.

Filed Under: intersectionality, anti-racism, social justice, Feminism, Intersections, racial justice

Intersections: For the Long Haul

December 05, 2016 by Bill Ivey
Since the week before the election, I’ve been attending the Vigil for Racial Justice in downtown Greenfield when I can. I first went with students and on our way back, we all agreed the school should offer it as a weekly activity - which we have been doing. Each time I’ve been there, it’s been a quite pleasant experience. Most people who passed by either ignored us, smiled, or honked supportively. I did have a conversation with one citizen on my way there one morning; he saw my poster and looked me in the eye and said, “All lives matter. All .” I smiled at him and cheerfully said, “I couldn’t agree more.” Because, to the founders of the movement, and to me, that is the fundamental message of the slogan “Black Lives Matter”  - in a country infused with and shaped by racism from its earliest days, all lives, including Black lives , matter equally. And that was as close as I had come to having a negative experience.

Filed Under: intersectionality, anti-racism, social justice, Feminism, Anti-Bullying, Intersections

Intersections: Feminist Affirmation

November 15, 2016 by Bill Ivey

This past Saturday, at a memorial service for a college friend, I shared stories of her ability to stand up for herself “with just the right touch of defiance,” of her deep seated insistence on being her own authentic self, of her feminist affirmation of women.

During the all-school meeting last Friday in which we held an open discussion about the range of thoughts and feelings following the election, one of our students shared her belief that women as a whole need to believe in themselves and their gender more strongly than they now do. After the meeting, I came across this quote (abridged here) shared on Gloria Steinem's Facebook page: “So while I do not pray for anybody or any party to commit outrages, still I do pray, and that earnestly and constantly, for some terrific shock to startle the women of this nation into a self-respect which will... give them the courage and conscience to speak and act for their own freedom, though they face the scorn and contempt of all the world for doing it.” I shared it with that student, wanting her to know not only that her voice had been heard but also that she had echoed the thoughts of a feminist icon.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice, Feminism, feminist school, Intersections

Intersections: Deciding to Rise

November 02, 2016 by Bill Ivey

When I was a girl, I had parents who loved me and believed in me, but those doubts still worked their way inside my head and my heart, and I was always worried about something. Does my hair look right? Am I too tall? Do I raise my hand too much in class? So when folks said that a girl like me shouldn’t aspire to go to the very best colleges in this country I thought, "Maybe they’re right." But eventually I learned that each of those doubts were like a little test, a challenge, that either I could shrink away from or rise up to meet and I decided to rise. - Michelle Obama, quoted by AISNE Assistant Director Bonnie Ricci at the AISNE Diversity Conference on November 1, 2016

It wasn’t particularly easy waking up at 4:45 in the morning to head out to the 2016 AISNE Diversity Conference. But it was well worth it, and not just for the chance to connect with familiar faces from other schools I don’t see often enough.

Ralph Wales, Head of Gordon School, welcomed us, asking the question, “What would happen if we were to start a school today?” He talked about aligning the power pyramid with our work in support of it, of the force and power we have to do right by all children, and of the concept of “pushing subversion.” Speaking as a person whose mood indicator has been stuck on subversive for several years, I can support that. The question, of course, is what to subvert, and how.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice, diversity, Feminism, Education, Intersections, inclusion

Intersections: Words in Motion

October 02, 2016 by Bill Ivey

Words in motion evoke change when spoken. - Jasmin Roberts

Because Thursday was Mountain Day, Rock Band had the night off, and that meant I was free to join EduColor’s 7:30 Twitter chat on engaging and supporting families of colour. Being white, this meant both an opportunity to chime in when I felt I genuinely had something worth adding, and an even greater opportunity to listen in and learn from voices of colour. I knew that if I retweeted every tweet I loved, I’d flood my timeline. So I found myself favoriting left and right so people would know I was listening and they were being heard.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice, equity, Education, Intersections

Intersections: Shining a Light

September 23, 2016 by Bill Ivey

A final entry as Ally Week 2016 winds down.

It’s been an eventful ally week, to say the least. Not so much on campus as off. Lots of opportunities for allyship. Lots of people stepping up.

One positive example followed VOYA (“Voices Of Youth Advocates”) magazine’s unaccountably biphobic and heterosexist review of Kody Keplinger’s book Run. Actually, the review was what one Twitterer referred to as “a hot mess” with not only biphobia and heterosexism but also ableism, slut shaming… the epitome of the privileged and judgmental viewpoint that doesn’t even see its own privilege talking. It ended with the admonition that, because one of the characters is openly and unapologetically bisexual, the book might not be appropriate for all young adult audiences. If you’re going to give a content warning at all, many people pointed out, wouldn’t the actual (heterosexual) sex be the logical choice rather than a simple affirmation of one’s orientation?

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice, Education, Bisexuality, Intersections

Intersections: "Powerfully on the Side of Love"

September 07, 2016 by Bill Ivey

 

Inspired by our Convocation ceremony on Monday, Sept. 5, 2016

“Where do our individual templates and belief systems come from?” Shayna Appel ‘78 asked, pausing a moment during her invocation. In telling a personal anecdote of when she needed to grow further into her own best self, and did, she was inviting us both implicitly and explicitly to consider the question. As Head of School Sally Mixsell ‘69 would later say, all you know is what you see when you first meet a person - what is most important is unseen and undiscovered. And we have, as Shayna pointed out, the freedom to choose different judgments and opinions, to bring a more critical awareness of ourselves and our certainties. Student Council President Molly Li ‘17, in her discussion of what the Honor Code means to her, told us that when she first came here as an eighth grader, she had feared she would be judged here by her looks and by her English. However, she said, everyone was always kind and respectful to her. And Miles DeClue ‘18, in her own take on the ritual reading (and eventual signing) of the Honor Code, noted that it comes down to personal responsibility.

Filed Under: social justice, Education, Mission Statement, Convocation, International perspective, Best self

Every Moment

July 09, 2016 by Bill Ivey

By all reports, he was a wonderful person, loved by the students in the school where he worked. He would smile at every child every day, and succeeded in making the cafeteria where he worked a happy space for them. One parent described him as “Mr. Rogers with dreadlocks” (Rafowicz, quoted in Lonetree) The J.J. Hill Montessori School PTO wrote, “Because you were a part of our community, we are better. / We will hold you and your family in peace and memoriam.”

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice, real world issues, Education

If There Is To Be Hope

June 13, 2016 by Bill Ivey

“When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace.” - Jimi Hendrix (quote shared on @teacherMRW’s Twitter feed)

One of the first things I read yesterday morning (Sunday, June 12, 2016) was this great piece by Jennifer Orr celebrating her school board. Having updated their non-discrimination policy to include transgender kids last year, they recently voted to update the school handbook as well, providing the concrete means to enforce the policy. As you may imagine, the decision was somewhat controversial, but in the end, as Ms. Orr said, “As a school system we serve ALL children. We must teach them AND keep them safe.”

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, social justice