2017 Poetry Festival

April 17, 2017 by Guest Student Author

Three Prize-Winning Student Poems

Filed Under: Poetry, National Poetry Month, Poetry Month, Poetry Festival

Ingrained Pain

April 14, 2017 by Guest Student Author

by Miles DeClue '18

Filed Under: student voice, Poetry, National Poetry Month, Poetry Month, Student work, Student Writing

Twilight's Lullaby

April 14, 2017 by Guest Student Author

by Gwen Healy '19

Filed Under: student voice, Poetry, National Poetry Month, Student work, Student Writing

Choice vs. Chance

January 28, 2017 by Guest Student Author

by Micah (To'Londa) Torres '18. Performed in housemeeting on Martin Luther King Day. The quote that inspired it is included at the end.

Filed Under: Poetry, anti-racism, racism, Black Lives Matter

Cherished Imperfections

September 15, 2016 by Guest Student Author

(a poem by Amelia Opsahl '21, written for Karen Suchenski's Humanities 8 class)

I am from dusty New York Times newspapers in a precarious stack, displaced shoes and the smell of fried eggs.

Filed Under: Middle School, Poetry, Authentic self

Poem by Annalie Gilbert Keith '18

April 25, 2016 by Guest Student Author

Reflection

Filed Under: student voice, Poetry, National Poetry Month

Poem by Siobhan Pascal '16

April 12, 2016 by Guest Student Author

The Unchanging Nights

Filed Under: student voice, Poetry, National Poetry Month, Education

Poem by Harper Watson '16

April 11, 2016 by Guest Student Author

Garden of the Body

Filed Under: student voice, Poetry, National Poetry Month

A Second Family

June 07, 2015 by Bill Ivey

A poem assembled from the words of every single middle schooler and read at the Eighth Grade Moving Up Ceremomy.

Filed Under: Poetry, 8th grade, Moving Up

The Gift of Tears

April 14, 2015 by Bill Ivey

"Hey, Bill's crying." I nodded quietly as the student reading her poem looked over at me and then continued.

The Humanities 7 class had just finished reading Part Four of I Am Malala and I had been at something of a loss for how to run the discussion. It's a short, painful section that begins immediately after the Taliban shot her for her advocacy of Western values (such as girls' education) and continues through her hopitalization in Pakistan to her being airlifted to England. I arrived in class prepared with several ideas for how to handle it, but it was only at the moment of truth that I decided to ask the students to write a poem in reaction to the section, telling them they would read their poem to the class but would not need to share it with me electronically. They set immediately to work, and eventually it was down to two students waiting for the last line of their poems to come to them. The others were already working independently on other things while waiting, so I could hope these students would not feel the pressure to stop before they genuinely felt ready.

Filed Under: Poetry, girls' education, In the Classroom, Malala Yousafzai