Seven SBS Students Conquer the Ragnar Trail New England Race

September 22, 2016 by Guest Faculty Bloggers

by Andrea Tehan Carnes

While most of our students were off enjoying a hot leisurely summer all across the globe, nine ambitious students decided to try something new and sign up to train for and run a 15-mile trail race in the nearby town of Northfield, Mass. I got the idea in my head to do this race with our girls a little over a year ago while volunteering at the same race at the registration table, when a rival cross-country team checked in their students to do the race. I thought to myself, "If THEY can do it, so can we!" A little recruiting -- and, surprisingly, not a lot of persuading -- later, we had nine girls ready to go. We only needed eight to fill a team, but as this wasn't the first time I had captained a relay team, I knew there would inevitably be a few people dropping out for unforeseen reasons. It was good to have a backup plan.

Filed Under: On Athletics, Feminism, Running, Best self

The hard is what makes it great

February 03, 2016 by Bill Ivey

( title quote from A League of Their Own)

Thank goodness for Annie. Most years, I can rely on my Twitter network to let me know National Girls and Women in Sports Day is approaching, but somehow this year, it caught me by surprise. Spurred on by Annie’s reminder, I was able to quickly assemble a photo gallery for Facebook, and selected a picture of a team cheer for Twitter (as it happens, last spring’s Fitness class preparing to compete in the RVAL Ultimate Frisbee tournament).

Filed Under: On Athletics, National Girls and Women in Sports Day, Feminism

Oh, joy. One whole day.

February 05, 2014 by Bill Ivey

Whatever you might have thought of the Super Bowl, at least it's a chance for the people of Seattle to celebrate their first championship in pro sports in 35 years, right?

Filed Under: women in sports, gender, athletics, social justice, On Athletics, National Girls and Women in Sports Day, Feminism, Women in media, Current Events

Nails in the Coffin?

April 25, 2013 by Bill Ivey

As many of you may know, and to no one’s surprise who follows women’s basketball, Brittney Griner, a 6’8” Senior from Baylor, was the first player to be chosen in the 2013 WNBA draft and will play for the Phoenix Mercury. With only three rounds and only 12 teams drafting, very few players are invited to attend in person, but of course Ms. Griner was there, all smiles, in a white tuxedo.

Two days later, during the course of an interview with “Sports Illustrated,” Ms. Griner was asked why she felt sexuality was no big deal in women’s sports. She responded, “I really couldn't give an answer on why that's so different. Being one that's out, it's just being who you are.” Asked if making the decision to come out had been difficult, she said, “It really wasn't too difficult, I wouldn't say I was hiding or anything like that. I've always been open about who I am and my sexuality. So, it wasn't hard at all.” Though the interview received a fair amount of attention on social media, it received attention more for the low-key “no big deal” feeling to the moment than for the news itself. As Wesley Morris said in his article “Brittney Griner and the Quiet Queering of Professional Sports,” “Maybe it was amazing for its utter whateverness.”

Filed Under: Brittney Griner, Middle School, women in sports, gender, Sports, gender stereotypes, athletics, On Education, Bill Ivey, Beautifully different, Gay-Straight Alliance, On Athletics, Acceptance, diversity, In the Classroom, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education

Gender Matters

April 17, 2013 by Bill Ivey

You could say I was frustrated. On the way home from Virginia on Sunday, April 7, at a gas station near Scranton, I had downloaded first the CBS Sports app and then the ESPN Sports app, but was unable to tune in to the UConnNotre Dame game. Baseball, NBA, and discussions about baseball and the NBA – and men's college basketball – abounded across my virtual dial. However, nowhere could I find a live broadcast of the women's Division-I basketball semi-final game even though it featured one of the premier rivalries in sports.

Shaking my head, I sent out a general tweet asking my friends to keep me informed of the half-time and final scores, started up my car, and got back on the road. Jeremy Deason, our former Athletic Director, and Susie Highley, a middle school teacher friend from Indiana, would both oblige, updating me every 10 basketball minutes or so. I knew Liz Feeley, our Director of Development and a former Notre Dame coach, had been nervous with excitement and anticipation all day, and I decided if only one of us was to be able to experience the game firsthand, it should be her. She must have been experiencing her own frustration, though, since Notre Dame ended up falling to UConn by nearly 20 points, a highly atypical margin from two teams who had produced a one-point game, a triple-overtime game, and a two-point game over the course of the season (all three games going to Notre Dame).

Filed Under: gender, NBA, Pat Summitt, athletics, professional sports, gender equity, On Athletics, WNBA, In the Classroom, Women in media, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School

Olympic Heights

July 30, 2012 by Bill Ivey

The hills up into Conway are starting to feel a little longer than I would like, and I can feel my leg muscles straining to keep the pace I've set, a little faster than I would normally choose. But I dig deep and force myself to keep going, maybe even step up the pace slightly. "You don't get to the Olympics by giving up on yourself," I tell myself. Eventually, I'm at the spot about two miles out where the road flattens out a bit before finally giving way to a longer downhill, and I enjoy a brief moment of exhilaration as my body shifts into cruise control.

Filed Under: gender, Grades 7-12, All-Girls, athletics, Bill Ivey, Olympics, On Athletics, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, The Faculty Perspective, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education

Ninja Women

February 07, 2012 by Bill Ivey

It's Sunday morning, February 5, and my Twitter feed is bursting with sports news and opinions. Most are about the Super Bowl, of course, and then, somewhat less mainstream, there's the one from Talib Kweli which links to an Atlantic article by Max Fisher on "Why Thousands of Iranian Women Are Training to Be Ninjas."

Filed Under: Middle School, women in sports, Grades 7-12 and PG, gender, Connecticut Sun, athletics, On Education, Boarding and Day, Ninjutsu, Boston Celtics, On Athletics, All Girls Education, Women's Professional Soccer, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, The Faculty Perspective, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education

Esprit de basket

January 10, 2012 by Bill Ivey

I will never forget the look on Ramses Lonlack’s face when we first walked into the Mullins Center at UMass. Her jaw dropped, her eyes widened, her head tilted back, and as she gazed slowly around the arena, she said softly yet firmly, “Some day, I’m going to play in a place like this.” Along with several other fans from Stoneleigh-Burnham, we sat down near the small but enthusiastic cohort that seemed to be made up mostly of friends, roommates, and family members to cheer on the UMass women’s basketball team, Ramses’s voice rising with many others as she got caught up in her enthusiasm.

Women’s basketball fans are indeed enthusiastic about their sport, and many of us share a bond that goes far deeper than whatever team(s) we happen to support. Liz Feeley is a former women’s basketball coach in Divisions I and III, but although she undoubtedly sees more in five seconds than I see in five games, she loves to discuss the chances of UConn (a team I’ve followed since Rebecca Lobo went there out of Western Massachusetts) vs. Notre Dame (one of her former teams) with me, and a Diet Coke now rides on each match-up. Similarly, when I took Ramses and another girl from Africa to a professional Connecticut Sun game, they discovered the visiting Los Angeles Sparks had a player from Africa and began to root loudly for the opponents. Other fans turned around to gaze at them, but rather than incredulity or irritation, their faces showed a kind of bemused delight.

The following year, I learned a friend of mine (Melissa Sterry, a Sun fan and former WNBA blogger whom I had gotten to know simply by starting an email conversation in reaction to one of her blogs) kept six season tickets for the express purpose of bringing people to Sun games and getting them interested in women’s ball. She invited me to bring a cohort of students whom we took out to dinner after the game so she could talk to them a bit about basketball and about their lives. Ramses was originally supposed to go to that game too, but at the last minute had to cancel because a Division I school had offered her a tryout. She expressed profound disappointment at missing the Sun game, but knew this was an opportunity she couldn’t pass up.

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Historical Interlude

Women’s basketball began in 1892 when Sendra Berenson of Smith College adapted the rules of the year-old sport for women. Players could only bounce the ball once before passing, and the court was divided into three zones to minimize running. Three players per team were assigned to each zone – guard, center, or forward. The first known women’s basketball game opposed the classes of 1895 and 1896, with the freshmen winning 5-4.

In 1914, just two years after the college opened, West Tennessee State Normal School played their own first women’s basketball game, winning 24-0 over a local high school. The college would undergo a number of name changes through the years, settling on the University of Memphis in 1994. Despite their early advocacy of women’s sports, the college demoted all women’s athletics from varsity status in 1936. They would remain so until the passage of Title IX, and the women’s basketball team was reinstated for the 1972-1973 season.

******

Ramses did end up at the University of Memphis, the school she missed the Sun game for, and made her mark quickly. She won the “Rookie of the Week” award her first week in the league, and has won numerous defensive awards. More recently, she approached a major milestone, her 1000th point. She has also grabbed more than 500 rebounds and had over 250 steals, and is only the 6th player in U. Memphis history to achieve at this level. As Ramses approached the milestone, an excited buzz rose up on the Internet in the spirit both of women’s basketball and of Stoneleigh-Burnham, and when she finally made it, friends and fans from all over joined in congratulations. We could not be happier for her or prouder of her, and wish her all the best as she continues through her senior season.

Photo credit: Joe Murphy

-Bill Ivey, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School Dean

Filed Under: Women's Basketball, Alumnae, Ramses Lonlack '08, University of Memphis, athletics, Boarding and Day, On Athletics, College Prep, All Girls Education, The Faculty Perspective, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education, Admissions

A Tale in Tweets, Posts and Photos.

November 10, 2011 by SBS Admissions

September 28, 2011:

@sbschoolorg

Filed Under: Grades 7-12 and PG, School Happenings, soccer, athletics, On Athletics, All Girls Education, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Education, Admissions

Just a Color

October 14, 2011 by Bill Ivey

Dance life deep into the dark night with the stars the keepers of your fate. No, you take its keeping. And the music of the peepers is the keeper of our salvation... In the end, there is one dance you do alone. – Millie Sutton (from an inscription in my high school yearbook)

It was the evening following Stoneleigh-Burnham’s graduation, a time normally given over to celebrations and parties. And indeed, part of our group was planning on stopping through on the way to or from one of those parties. But a solid core of us had decided to spend the entire night at the Greenfield Relay for Life, which happened to fall on the same date as our graduation that year. When I arrived around dinnertime with my tent and sleeping bag, I found a festive atmosphere. There was music, food, decorations, and a fire (s’mores!) around which many of us were sitting and talking. Several members of our team were out on the track at the Franklin County Fairgrounds, including Jess, the newly-minted alumna who (along with her parents Cyndee and Bill) was the driving force behind our presence. We had spent months holding bake sales, tag sales, car washes and more, raising money in every way we could think of. We had succeeded in meeting Jess’s goal of every single participant raising at least $100 to fight cancer. And now it was time to celebrate the newest SBS graduates, our group’s fund-raising success, and even more importantly, the progress that was and is being made in the fight against cancer.

Filed Under: Middle School, Alumnae, Grades 7-12 and PG, School Happenings, Boarding and Day, On Athletics, All Girls Education, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Admissions