In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

January 16, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere. Anyone who lives inside the US can never be considered an outsider anywhere in the country. (Dr. Martin Luther King)

Filed Under: Martin Luther King Jr, Martin Luther King Day

Who Are We?

January 18, 2016 by Guest Student Author

by Mckim Jean-Pierre '16

Filed Under: Martin Luther King Jr, anti-racism, social justice, Martin Luther King Day, Education

The Change Our Future Generations Deserve

January 22, 2015 by Guest Student Author

(a speech delivered at Housemeeting on Monday, January 19, 2015 in honor of Martin Luther King Day)

Filed Under: Martin Luther King Jr, student voice, anti-racism, social justice, Martin Luther King Day

Taking the First Step

January 20, 2014 by Bill Ivey

An address to the school delivered on Martin Luther King Day.

Filed Under: Martin Luther King Jr, Little Rock, social justice, diversity, Current Events, racism, Martin Luther King Day

The Necessity of Maladjustment

January 14, 2013 by Bill Ivey

My shoulder grew progressively numb as my friend, convinced that everyone who claimed to be a pacifist had a breaking point, kept hitting it over and over. His face began to contort, and through gritted teeth he hissed, "I'm going to make you hit me." But I didn't hit back, and eventually he walked away in disgust. I've always wondered what he took away from the incident. Me, I took pride in having successfully maintained my principles of non-violence, though as it turned out I couldn't have moved my arm if I had wanted, and it hung uselessly at my side for at least five minutes as I walked to my next class and took my seat.

Filed Under: Teaching, tragedy, On Education, Bill Ivey, On Parenting, discrimination, sandy hook, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, violence, joan baez, racism, Martin Luther King Day, peace

The Fierce Urgency of… Whenever?

January 16, 2012 by Bill Ivey

As I do every Monday, I walked into my Humanities 7 class and asked, “Who wants to read their independent writing today?” Several people did, but a greater number said they weren’t sure and asked for me to write their name on the white board in parentheses, our special code for “I’ll decide at the last minute.” The last few weeks, there had been increasing numbers of parentheses, a trend I had decided needed to stop in its tracks.

So while the students who were reading were starting up their laptops and pulling up the documents, I decided to whip open my iPad and search online for Taylor Mali’s poem, “Totally like whatever, you know?” The poem begins, “In case you hadn’t noticed / it has somehow become uncool / to sound like you know what you’re talking about?” and ends with these lines: “Because contrary to the bumper sticker, / it is not enough these days to simply QUESTION AUTHORITY. / You have to speak with it, too.” We had a great discussion about the poem, and they totally like, you know… got it that I am working to teach them to “speak with conviction.” Our discussion ended with the following dialogue:

Filed Under: Middle School, Teaching, Grades 7-12 and PG, School Happenings, All-Girls, Dream, On Education, Celebrating Holidays, Boarding and Day, All Girls Education, In the Classroom, Stoneleigh-Burnham Middle School, The Faculty Perspective, Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Martin Luther King Day, Education