Intersections: In Sync

September 17, 2016 by Bill Ivey

In my earlier post about the first day of classes with my Humanities 7 class, I mentioned that Alex Bogel, Academic Dean and IB Coordinator, was going to replicate one of our activities with his Junior Theory of Knowledge (“TOK)” class. They would use the white board and chalkboard to brainstorm on “how people learn,” and then work in groups to discern the various themes running through each panel.

Filed Under: Middle School, IB, Education

Textbook Cases

October 12, 2015 by Bill Ivey

I’ve been playing and replaying in my head the conversation the IB History 2 class had, a couple of weeks ago on the day I subbed, about textbooks and objectivity. With acknowledgment that the more one replays a memory, the more one can unknowingly alter it…

Filed Under: anti-racism, social justice, IB, Education, Global Perspective

Living The Kite Runner

September 19, 2013 by Guest Faculty Bloggers

Standing in line for food during Formal Dinner last week, I was approached by a new student, "S." '14 (her name has been withheld to protect her anonymity), whom I’d only known from house parenting duties. She told me, in her quiet manner, that my 11th graders’ English summer reading book, The Kite Runner, is her favorite novel. She continued by telling me that she is a Hazara, of the same tribe as Hassan, one of the significant characters in The Kite Runner, and that she has experienced similar discrimination growing up in Afghanistan as he has in the novel. As IB learners I thought that the girls would benefit from meeting "S." and hearing her story, as it relates to The Kite Runner, and I asked her if she would be interested in talking to both of my classes. "S." graciously, and without any hesitation, accepted my invitation.

"S." had prepared a Power Point presentation in advance and she began by giving us a brief history of Afghanistan and telling us about her family. She then proceeded by relating her experiences growing up in Afghanistan to The Kite Runner. The thing that struck me the most was that "S." at such a young age was able to talk about her difficult experiences with such clarity and in such an unblemished manner. She has already gained perspective and made sense of her country’s violent history and the effect it has had, and still has, on her family and her people. "S." has decided not to let her experience bring her down; instead she has been able to turn it into something positive. She told the class about her volunteer work at the same orphanage in which one of the characters in The Kite Runner grew up. She and her sisters have had the rare opportunity to pursue an education and "S." is a courageous and passionate advocate for girls’ education and women’s rights. At a very young age she has her goals set and is determined to make a change in the world.

Filed Under: afghanistan, girls' education, IB, In the Classroom, The Kite Runner, The Faculty Perspective, International Baccalaureate, Uniquely Stoneleigh-Burnham School