Intersections: #LoveMySchoolDay

April 11, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Early this morning, one of our English teachers posted that she would be needing someone to cover E period because one of her children was sick. Four minutes later, I saw it and immediately wrote and offered to help. But I was too late, as it turned out - one of my colleagues in the Performing Arts Department had already grabbed the chance.

Filed Under: Girls Schools, community, Feminism, feminist school, Intsersections, #LoveMySchoolDay

Intersections: Rising Girls

April 09, 2017 by Bill Ivey

When you combine sound with goals, happiness, possibilities, you’ve got the perfect storm. - June Millington, from her TEDxShelburneFalls talk, “Rocking the Boat:How Playing Like a Girl Can Change the World.

A guitar strums a four-chord progression. A bass joins in. A rat-a-tat-a-tat on the drums kicking off a solid backbeat. The first lyric, “With your feet in the air and your head on the ground. Try this trick and spin it, yeah.” (Where Is My Mind? by the Pixies) resonates through the gym. Last night’s benefit concert for Girls Rising was off to a great start.

Filed Under: Rock Band, Feminism, Mission Statement, Women in Rock, Intersections, #GirlsRock

Intersections: Even Stronger

April 04, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Only rarely have I ever looked forward to a game more than my beloved UConn women’s basketball team going up against Mississippi State in this year’s March Madness semis. After all, one of our school’s alumnae, Chinwe Okorie, played for MSU and was likely to get significant playing time. It would be wonderful to root her on as well as my own favourite team. I confess, though, I was a little jittery as to how UConn would do. At one point in the season, MSU had been ranked #2, and they were the only highly ranked team UConn had not yet faced. I felt in my bones that, if anyone was going to stop UConn in this tournament, and I knew that was possible, MSU had perhaps the best chance.

Filed Under: athletics, basketball, gender equity, equity, Feminism, college athletics, Intersections, Title IX, women's sports

Intersections: #GirlsRock

April 03, 2017 by Bill Ivey

As a Rock Band teacher, I try to keep my eye out for kids, especially girls, who have talent and whom I can help promote on social media. One such artist is Sina from Germany, a 16-year-old girl who first came to YouTube fame at the age of 14; her drum cover of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” now has nearly 3,000,000 views. Earlier today, YouTube recommended I listen to her (amazing!) international collaboration with two 12-year-old girls of the classic “Smoke in the Water”; it’s nearing 100,000 views after just three weeks.

Filed Under: music, Girls Schools, Rock Band, Feminism, Women in Rock, Intersections, #GirlsRock, Antigone Rising

Intersections: Supporting our kids in a time of increasing intolerance

March 28, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Since the rescinding of Obama-era guidance extending Title IX protections against discrimination to transgender and gender non-conforming children, there has been an outpouring of support for LGBTQ+ kids. TransLifeline saw their website crash under the weight of donations pouring in, multiple organizations have shared ways to protect, support, and reassure transgender and gender non-conforming children, and governors, other elected representatives, parents, and citizens have shared their own words of support and comfort.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, Feminism, Intersections, identity, Supporting Jewish people, Courage

Intersections: Not My Kids, You Don't

February 08, 2017 by Bill Ivey

You all probably know the poem,

  • “First they came for [group of people] and I did not speak out, because I was not [part of that group of people]...
  • then they came for…
  • (...)
  • and then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak for me.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, diversity, Feminism, feminist school, Intersections

Declaration of Sentiments (2017 version)

February 05, 2017 by Guest Student Author

This Declaration of Sentiments, modeled on the original, was written by the Humanities 7 class along with the middle school girls from Bancroft School, Center School, Eaglebrook School, Four Rivers Charter Public School, Hampshire Regional School, and Hilltop Montessori School who attended their Convention on Women's Rights on January 9, 2017.

Filed Under: women's movement, Feminism, feminist school

On the Right Track

February 01, 2017 by Bill Ivey
  • The general public has viewed her sports as lesser; his sports are more widely regarded and compensated than hers.
  • Media has favored his sports over hers.

From the updated “Declaration of Sentiments” written by the Humanities 7 class along with girls from Bancroft School, Center School, Eaglebrook School, Four Rivers Charter Public School, Hampshire Regional School, and Hilltop Montessori School.


I often feel like I have to apologize for being a fan of the UConn women’s basketball team. They’ve won four straight NCAA Division-I championships, their current win streak (which broke their own record of 90) stands at 95, and their average margin of victory is in the double digits. Other than the UCLA men’s basketball team of the John Wooden era, no program that I can think of has dominated a college sport to this extent. So some baggage comes with identifying as a UConn fan, especially if you didn’t actually go there.

Filed Under: women in sports, Sports, anti-racism, National Girls and Women in Sports Day, Feminism, Women in media, Intersections

The United States of America UNITES again

January 31, 2017 by Guest Student Author

by Gabrielle (Bri) Rooks '18

For as long as I can remember, image has been everything. What people think about us seems to be the main focus for many. We tend to put ourselves in categories. Sometimes we start to label people before we know them. Say you are walking down the street and you meet someone for the first time. The first thing you probably notice about them is what they look like and what their actions are implying. This automatically triggers us to put a label on them. It so common for us to look for differences that we tend to lose sight of what we have in common. When we see someone with a disability that keeps them in a wheelchair, we automatically start looking at them or treating them differently based on that one thing that “defines” them. The only thing that makes you different from that person is the way you are choosing to look at them. In a community, there are categories that people fall under based on the definitions we have created. For example, there is the higher class, the middle class and the lower class in a community. Looking at a specific community such as a school setting, you find categories for the jocks, the geeks, the popular and so on. Who decides these categories, these labels, these stereotypes? Who establishes the things that define each of us? Well the answer to all this is quite simple — WE DO! We put ourselves in these categories. We are the ones who give each other labels. We are the ones who stray away from what is not “the norm.”

Filed Under: women's movement, intersectionality, Feminism, Women's March

Intersections: Too feminine?

January 17, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Yesterday, Mark Anthony Neal shared a link to an article in the New York Times by Claire Cain Miller entitled, “Job Listings That Are Too ‘Feminine’ for Men.” Among the key points:

  • Many of the fastest-growing job fields have traditionally been female-dominated.
  • Job descriptions in fields that have traditionally been female-dominated use language like “empathetic,” “caring,” and “families.” They attract more women than men, and are more likely to lead to a female hire.
  • Job descriptions in fields that have traditionally been male-dominated use language like “manage,” “forces,” and “superior.” They attract more men than women, and are more likely to lead to a male hire.
  • That said, women have been more ready to enter traditionally male-dominated occupations than men traditionally female-dominated occupations.
  • Gender-neutral language in job descriptions causes vacant posts to be filled more quickly.

Filed Under: gender stereotypes, Feminism, Intersections