Intersections: A Day Without Women

March 07, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Because we are on spring break this International Women’s Day, the question of whether and how we might be participating in the national “day without women” never really came up. I’ve heard of public school districts where sufficient numbers of women have requested the day off that they have simply cancelled classes for the day, and here at my wife’s school (a girls school which is still in session), some of the kids have expressed their desire to participate.

Suppose our own school were in session and had made plans to participate. What might a day without women have looked like?

Filed Under: Women, intersectionality, Girls Schools, International Women's Day, Intersections, Day Without Women

Student Photo Contest: Feb. 2017

February 21, 2017 by Guest Student Author

The school's Photo Club recently held a contest. The winners were Ember Larregui '18, Ingrid Storebo '17, and Juliana Merullo '19. Congratulations!

Filed Under: arts, Student work, photos, Photography

Intersections: A Strong Wish I Make Every Night

February 20, 2017 by Bill Ivey
My kids are incredible. Just putting it out there (with all respect for the thousands and thousands of teachers who could and do say the same about their own kids, and with all respect for those kids as well). The kid who came waltzing into my office and almost sang, “Bill, I figured out something about myself. I’m pansexual!” The kid who said, “Whether you’re talking about romantic or sexual relationships, and whoever you’re into, I just don’t see how it’s anyone’s business but your own.” The kid who said, “Well, I’m really genderfluid, but it’s easier not to change my pronouns every day so I just use “‘they/them/their.’” The kids who went  “Awwwwww…” and “Finally!” when the best friend of the trans girl in George said, “And you know what? If you think you’re a girl… then I think you’re a girl too!” (Gino) They’re growing up with spectrums of sexuality and gender, embracing them as simply a part of their everyday reality. And I want them to feel that level of comfort, with themselves and with each other.

Filed Under: LGBT, LGBT Support, transgender, Intersections, Title IX

Untitled

February 20, 2017 by Guest Student Author

by Annabel Holmes '22

We're all so complex.

And it confuses me when people allow for one moment, or mistake or event or even an instance of something tragic or unusual, to define them entirely as a whole.

We're not made up of the things we've said, or done; nor are we made up of the aspects we dislike about ourselves. We're not what others, or ourselves see us as, think of us as, or define us as; we're not the mistakes that we've made, the things that we've done in the past, or the stuff that we've screwed up or shattered to pieces with our own hands and actions. We're not any of those things, our thoughts don't define us, and neither does what we say.

Filed Under: Middle School, student voice, creative writing

Intersections: Excellence

February 17, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Here is a comprehensive list of all the NCAA basketball programs besides the UConn women’s side that have ever won 100 straight games:

1.

Not only is the feat unprecedented, but also they have kept it going in a year where few people if any predicted they would maintain this level of dominance. Their top three players - who just happened to also be the first three players taken in the WNBA draft, a feat that is also unprecedented - had graduated, and while this year’s group certainly had talent, they were seen as a young team due for what passes as a rebuilding year at UConn.

Filed Under: Teaching, student voice, athletics, Education, Student support, Intersections, Excellence

Intersections: #ProductOfPublicSchools

February 12, 2017 by Bill Ivey

Honestly, I never dreamed it would be a controversial post. One of my friends had posted a listing of all the public schools she had attended with the caption, “Proud member of #ProductOfPublicSchools.” So I did the same, from O’Dea Elementary School in Fort Collins, Colorado through my four schools in Amherst, Massachusetts: Marks Meadow Elementary School, Amherst Regional Junior High School, Amherst Regional High School, and the University of Massachusetts, where I got my M.A.T. in French (For the record, I got my A.B. in French from Middlebury College, which I also loved.) Not two minutes later, I got the response back from another ARHS graduate: “So what?”

Filed Under: education policy, Education, Intersections, Department of Education, Public Schools

Intersections: Not My Kids, You Don't

February 08, 2017 by Bill Ivey

You all probably know the poem,

  • “First they came for [group of people] and I did not speak out, because I was not [part of that group of people]...
  • then they came for…
  • (...)
  • and then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak for me.

Filed Under: LGBT Support, anti-racism, diversity, Feminism, feminist school, Intersections

Declaration of Sentiments (2017 version)

February 05, 2017 by Guest Student Author

This Declaration of Sentiments, modeled on the original, was written by the Humanities 7 class along with the middle school girls from Bancroft School, Center School, Eaglebrook School, Four Rivers Charter Public School, Hampshire Regional School, and Hilltop Montessori School who attended their Convention on Women's Rights on January 9, 2017.

Filed Under: women's movement, Feminism, feminist school

On the Right Track

February 01, 2017 by Bill Ivey
  • The general public has viewed her sports as lesser; his sports are more widely regarded and compensated than hers.
  • Media has favored his sports over hers.

From the updated “Declaration of Sentiments” written by the Humanities 7 class along with girls from Bancroft School, Center School, Eaglebrook School, Four Rivers Charter Public School, Hampshire Regional School, and Hilltop Montessori School.


I often feel like I have to apologize for being a fan of the UConn women’s basketball team. They’ve won four straight NCAA Division-I championships, their current win streak (which broke their own record of 90) stands at 95, and their average margin of victory is in the double digits. Other than the UCLA men’s basketball team of the John Wooden era, no program that I can think of has dominated a college sport to this extent. So some baggage comes with identifying as a UConn fan, especially if you didn’t actually go there.

Filed Under: women in sports, Sports, anti-racism, National Girls and Women in Sports Day, Feminism, Women in media, Intersections

The United States of America UNITES again

January 31, 2017 by Guest Student Author

by Gabrielle (Bri) Rooks '18

For as long as I can remember, image has been everything. What people think about us seems to be the main focus for many. We tend to put ourselves in categories. Sometimes we start to label people before we know them. Say you are walking down the street and you meet someone for the first time. The first thing you probably notice about them is what they look like and what their actions are implying. This automatically triggers us to put a label on them. It so common for us to look for differences that we tend to lose sight of what we have in common. When we see someone with a disability that keeps them in a wheelchair, we automatically start looking at them or treating them differently based on that one thing that “defines” them. The only thing that makes you different from that person is the way you are choosing to look at them. In a community, there are categories that people fall under based on the definitions we have created. For example, there is the higher class, the middle class and the lower class in a community. Looking at a specific community such as a school setting, you find categories for the jocks, the geeks, the popular and so on. Who decides these categories, these labels, these stereotypes? Who establishes the things that define each of us? Well the answer to all this is quite simple — WE DO! We put ourselves in these categories. We are the ones who give each other labels. We are the ones who stray away from what is not “the norm.”

Filed Under: women's movement, intersectionality, Feminism, Women's March